Teen dating violence power and control wheel

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All too often these examples suggest that violence in a relationship is normal, but violence is never acceptable. According to the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline, teen dating violence (TDV) is a pattern of behavior that someone uses to gain control over his or her dating partner.It is also important to note that “dating” is a term that adults tend to use to identify romantic relationships between young people; accordingly, that’s the term that we use in describing these dynamics on this page.However, teens use a range of terms to characterize their romantic relationships; common terms include—hanging out, hooking up, going out, crushing, flirting, seeing, etc.This wheel represents a snapshot of what a violent teen dating relationship looks like.While it doesn't cover every survivor's experience, it does portray the most common tactics teen abusers use against their dating partners.The outer rim of the wheel is physical violence as violent acts or the threat of violent acts are what abusers use to get and keep their power and control over their dating partners.

Often this behavior is a form of verbal or emotional abuse perpetrated through technology.

A 2017 CDC Report [PDF 4.32MB] found that approximately 7% of women and 4% of men who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner first experienced some form of partner violence by that partner before 18 years of age. Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent.

The 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey found approximately 10% of high school students reported physical victimization and 10% reported sexual victimization from a dating partner in the 12 months* before they were surveyed. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who: Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

(If you are on a mobile device, click here to see a static version of the Power and Control Wheel.) Do you recognize any of the warning signs in your own relationship? 2009-TA-AX-K015 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.

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